Classical Education vs. Common Core Standards

At Loveland Classical Schools (LCS) our curriculum is not influenced by the standards set by the state through Common Core. We utilize Core Knowledge and classical curriculum which goes beyond the standards set by the state, thereby giving our students a well-rounded education. To teach only to the state standards limits the classical education provided by LCS:

  • By adapting to the Common Core state standards, LCS’ autonomy is taken away.
  • Grade level standards provided by the government’s Common Core state standards are a starting point and bare minimum expectations. The Common Core state standards only focus on what students can do; LCS’ classical education and Core Knowledge curriculum expands on this to establish a strong foundation of content knowledge in the pursuit of wisdom in our students.
  • Common Core state standards do not address character or virtues in any way. LCS’ core virtues are a central tenant of our classical educational philosophy.
  • LCS’ Core Knowledge and classical curriculum is founded on the great works and ideas of Western civilization that have been handed down to us by past generations. Common Core state standards are solely focused on job and college readiness. At LCS, students will be workforce ready, as well as, prepared for college; however, our starting point with the student is in the pursuit of wisdom.
  • Though Common Core state standards may provide benchmarks for each grade to achieve, it becomes a hindrance for LCS students to succeed through the Core Knowledge curriculum through the loss of autonomy. The Core Knowledge curriculum allows LCS to help each student succeed at their own, unique pace.

By providing a classical education, versus a progressive education – which is the ideology of education from which Common Core stems, students will be better prepared for life after school, regardless of what path they take. The goal of a classical educational approach is not to produce a great worker nor a great test-taker, but rather to cultivate a great person; who subsequently will be able to demonstrate or learn the skills needed in any arena of life.